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Thoughts on Mike Pence "won't dine alone with a woman who isn't his wife"

April 10, 2017

Read the Yahoo news article here

 

Religious beliefs dictate much of our social behavior. Now and in the past, Christianity and Islam have modified an individuals behavior and set certain rules for what is considered moral behavior.

Recently, it was reported on the news that the Vice President of the United States proclaims that he does not allow himself to dine with a woman on a one-on-one basis if he is alone with her. Is this a question of honor?

 

He would have no hesitation of having a meal with a male?  What does that imply?

What if the man were gay?

 

This discrimination seems to be based on gender and archaic belief systems that men and women can’t work together without there being a risk of sexual overture.

 

 

While it is one’s personal choice of who to dine with, as a representative of the government, if the second-in-command refuses to meet alone with a person of the opposite sex, what message does that send leaders in other countries and companies?

 

Does that make my boss less than honorable if we have lunch together to discuss work? Does that make me a less honorable woman who is just trying to conduct business as usual?

 

The underwriting is clear, honorable men and women should not be alone together as it might lead to less than honorable activity, which implies that those who do, are less than honorable?

 

In today’s world of equality for women, workforce commitments, many working men and women have one-on-one meetings in order to get the job done, without a lingering shadow of eighteenth century moral turpitude haunting the proceedings.

 

We have come a long way (or have we) from the old ages when it was considered immoral for a honorable man and an honorable woman to be seen dining or talking alone, outside of a personal relationship.

 

I can’t count the number of times I have had meetings with male colleagues in order to discuss work or business. The modern world would collapse in part, if we put a limit on who the head of state could dine with, unaccompanied.

 

Where does such thinking originate from? Is it schooling? One’s church or what one’s mom taught them?

 

At FACES, these are the kinds of questions we like to ask, questions of embedded biases, archaic belief systems, and behaviors that alienate and misplace moral belief systems.

Got any thoughts on this article? Feel free to email me at smasood@svfaces.org. I would love to hear from you and have a healthy discussion on any matter.

 

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